Abbreviations on pay slip explained in more detail

Reading your pay slip is not always easy. There are often many abbreviations that sometimes cannot be directly traced back to their meaning and a legend is usually absent, causing many people to search the internet for the meaning of, for example, Zvw, ZW-A or svw. And for example, what does the ‘colour’ white on your pay slip mean, what about the labor discount and where can you find the travel costs? Here you will find an overview of the meaning of all these terms.

Pay slip abbreviations

  • Most common abbreviations on the pay slip
  • Cumulatives
  • Holiday pay and hour reservations

Most common abbreviations on the pay slip

The following abbreviations are often found and cannot be clearly traced back to a familiar concept for everyone:

  • Hk – Tax credit. This is usually followed by a ‘yes’ or ‘no’, or the number 0, 1 or 2 to indicate whether or not the payroll tax credit is applied to your wages.
  • Kl – Color. Usually you will read here that the color is white. This means that the statement relates to current employment.
  • BT% – Percentage Special Rate. This applies to one-off payments such as your holiday pay in May or June.
  • WAO – Disability Act. This is usually followed by a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to indicate whether you fall under this category.
  • WGA – Return to work for partially disabled people. For those returning from sick leave.
  • ZW-A – Sickness Benefits Act. This is usually followed by a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to indicate whether you fall under this.
  • ZVW – Health Insurance Act. This is usually followed by a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to indicate whether you fall under this category. Also called ZW for Sickness Insurance.
  • ZFW – Ditto.
  • SVW – Social Insurance Act.
  • Wk – Week number. Used to indicate which week the wage relates to.
  • Zww wn – Employee contribution to the Health Insurance Act. The amount that your employee pays for this is stated here.
  • Unb. cf. – Tax-free reimbursements. Reimbursements that you receive on which no tax has to be paid.
  • Unb. content – Tax-free deductions. Deductions on which no tax has to be paid.
  • TvT – TijdVoorWerk.
  • EH – Final tax.

Cumulatives

Under the heading cumulatives , a sum is made of the number of cases. This usually concerns the total number of days worked, the social wage (soc. wage), the tax wage (fisc. wage), the settled labor discount (verr. arb.), pension (pens), deductions under the social insurance law ( SVW- withholding tax) and payroll tax. You will need this information at the end of the year for your tax return.

Holiday pay and hour reservations

Your pay slip usually also states how much holiday pay and hour reservations you have already saved up to that point. Hour reservations are often used by employment agencies and secondment contracts so that when you want to take time off, you can be paid from this pot because you do not have a contract that includes a number of days off. You can also often get paid out of this if you have been ill. Hour reservations are not expressed in money but in hours on the pay slip. If you want to know how much it would be if you had it paid out in full, you must multiply this number by your hourly wage. Please note that you have to pay 33% tax on this amount when you have it paid out, even if you normally fall into a lower rate. Your holiday pay is expressed in euros (). This amount is normally paid out in May or June. If you work through a secondment agency, you can often have it paid out in the meantime. You also have to pay 33% tax on this, regardless of the fact that you may normally fall into a lower rate.